Interesting Facts about the New APA 7th Edition – 2020 Guide

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There is a new version of the American Psychological Association (APA) writing style, which is the APA 7th edition. We all know that most people hate change, regardless if it is good or not. Therefore, it is no surprise that the new APA version is not sitting well with students, especially those who struggle when it comes to writing styles. It has left most students scratching their heads and having migraines because they cannot wrap their fingers around what has changed or where. Thus, the majority of them daunt the day they will have to use the APA 7th edition in their assignments.

Regardless of whether you have already come across the new APA version, the fact is that the changes are quite straightforward and easy to apply. The changes have perhaps made this formatting style easier to use and apply. If you do not understand the changes in this writing style, you can always look for help. For example, you can seek online tutoring help in writing styles from professional services like acemyhomework.com. Without further ado, let us dive into the changes that have been made in this writing style.

Changes in Book Citing

When citing in the 6th edition of APA, a student had to include the publication location in their reference. Whether it was given or not, a student had to research and then add it. However, in this new edition, you no longer have to include the publication location. Take a look at the difference between citing a book in both the 6th and 7th edition of APA:

  • 6th edition: Covey, S. R., & Covey, S. (2020). The 7 habits of highly effective people. Norwalk, CT: The Easton Press. Simon & Schuster.
  • 7th edition: Covey, S. R., & Covey, S. (2020). The 7 habits of highly effective people. Simon & Schuster.

Changes in In-text Citations for Three or More Authors

Initially, when a student was using a material with three authors, they had to include all of them in the in-text citation. They did not have to include the phrase ‘et al.’ However, in this new edition, a student has to include this phrase if at all, their material has more than three authors. Again, this change is making it easier for students who struggle with writing APA in-text citations. Here is the difference between in-text citations with three authors written in both the 6th and 7th APA versions:

  • 6th edition: (Kotler, Smith, & Pete, 2019)
  • 7th edition: (Kotler et al., 2019)

Changes in the Title Page

The title page has also been altered to make it easier for students to cite in APA. Previously, students using the 6th edition had to format their first page differently. For example, they had to include the words ‘Running head’ on their title page. However, these words have been done away with, meaning that you only have to include the title of the work and the page number in your title page header. Your title page also has to include the following:

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  • the title of the work,
  • the name of each author of the work,
  • the affiliation for each author,
  • an author note (if desired),
  • a running head (also appearing in the other pages)
  • a page number (also appearing in the other pages)

Changes in the DOI Formatting

In the 6th APA version, DOIs were referenced differently from the URLs. However, in this new edition, the two will be referenced the same. It means that students will have to include the word ‘Http’ whenever they are citing a DOI. Nonetheless, you do not write this word and complete your citation. You also have to complete the entire link to make it make sense. Take a look at the changes:

Changes when Writing References with More than Seven and at Least Twenty Authors

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In the 6th edition, when writing a reference list of material with more than seven authors, a student was required to the surnames and initials of the first seven authors. It was a lot easier and less bulky, which made students to ace through their reference list quickly. However, the new change in this segment will require students to write all seventeen, twelve, or nineteen last names and initials of the authors. The 7th edition stipulates that all surnames and initials of the first twenty authors have to be included. Here is a look at the difference between the reference lists with twenty authors in both editions:

  • 6th edition: Michael, T. K., Bob, M. J., Whitney, G. M., Seth, B. B., Keith, P. T., Ricky, S. K., … Lee, W. H. (2015).
  • 7th edition: Michael, T. K., Bob, M. J., Whitney, G. M., Seth, B. B., Keith, P. T., Ricky, S. K., Lewis, F., Lee, W. H., Kendra, G., Harry, I. S., Martinez, P., Godfrey, W. L., Hughes, W., Curtis, D., Catherine, G., Baker, A. F., Flora, J., Winnie, S. M., Gregory, G., … Lewis, L. T. (2015).

Changes in the Font Style and Size

Students using the APA 6th edition were required to only use Times New Roman font and in size 12. Anything other than this was considered wrong, and it resulted in penalties. However, students can now relax because the APA 7th edition is introducing additional new fonts that can be used. They are shown below with a sample text:

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  • Georgia 11: Always consult with a doctor before taking any medication.
  • Times New Roman 12: Always consult with a doctor before taking any medication.
  • Calibri 11: Always consult with a doctor before taking any medication.
  • Arial 11: Always consult with a doctor before taking any medication.
  • Lucida Sans Unicode 10: Always consult with a doctor before taking any medication.

Although most students would argue that the latest APA version is complicated, it is in the real sense quite straightforward. The changes are direct, which makes it easier for students to learn the current version and apply it without any difficulty. The changes have also made things easier for scholars and researchers using this writing style.